Consortia of leading international companies with local partners have formed to bid for six build-own-operate (BOO) plants costing a total of around $4,600 million. A total of 57 prequalification applications were returned to the Ministry by the closing date of 27 September.

Contracting sources say the following consortia of foreign and local companies have formed to bid for individual plants:

Adapazari (natural gas – 700-MW): the UK’s National Power with Bayindir and Mimag; Guris; Enka; Tekfen with the US’ Cogen Technology; the US’ Howard Energy International; Alarko with Altek; the US’ Trinity Partners and Mobil Power with Destec Energy and Genel Energy; Europe’s ABB Asea Brown Boveri and Russia’s Gazprom with Entes.

Gebze (natural gas – 700-MW): National Power with Bayindir and Mimag: Tekfen with Cogen Technology; Ova Elektrik; Germany’s Siemens KWU Power; Belgium’s Unit International; ABB Asea Brown Boveri and Gazprom with Enka

Gebze 2 (natural gas – 700-MW): National Power with Bayindir and Mimag; Tekfen with Cogen Technology; Siemens KWU Power; Howard Energy International; Unit International; Ova Elektrik; Enka; Nurol; ABB Brown Boveri and Gazprom with Entes

Ankara (natural gas – 700-MW): National Power with Bayindir and Mimag; ABB Asea Brown Boveri and Gazprom with Entes; Guris; Enka; Nurol; Howard Energy International; Unit International

Izmir (natural gas – 1,400-MW):

Howard Energy International; Guris; Enka; the US’ AMOCO with Otak; France’s Total with SEI, Unit International; ABB Asea Brown Boveri with Gazprom and Entes

Iskenderun (imported coal – 1,000 MW): Mobil Power and the US’ General Electric with Bayindir; Siemens KWU Power; National Power with Gama; Guris; Enka; Trinity Partners; Ekinciler Holding

The first two plants are due to be commissioned in 2000, the next two in 2001, Izmir in two stages between 2001 and 2005, and Iskenderun in 2003. The Ministry hoped to draw up a short-list by 10 October. Thereafter, short-listed groups will have until 20 December to prepare and submit feasibility studies for their chosen projects.

Along with another seven BOO projects, the six form a key part of an integrated energy development programme estimated to cost $24,000 million being drafted by the Ministry at the direction of the government to meet soaring energy demand projections up to the year 2020.