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Kuwait has already started its mediator role in the latest spat between Qatar and its GCC neighbours.

In an interview with Doha-based news network Al-Jazeera, Qatar’s foreign minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman al-Thani said Kuwait’s ruler had asked Qatar’s emir to hold off on giving a speech about the crisis.

“He received a call from the emir of Kuwait asking him to postpone it in order to give time to solve the crisis,” the minister said.

Kuwait served as an arbitrator in a similar fallout in 2014, when Saudi Arabia and the UAE accused Qatar of supporting the Muslim Brotherhood. That dispute lasted eight months.

Turkey has also offered its support as a possible mediator despite often being accused of supporting the Muslim Brotherhood.

“Countries may of course have some issues, but dialogue must continue under every circumstance for problems to be resolved peacefully,” Turkey’s foreign minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said in a press conference on 5 June. “We are saddened by the current picture and will give any support for its normalisation.”

Kuwait, Oman and Turkey have not imposed any sanctions on Doha.

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